pureScale at the Beach. – What’s New in the DB2 “Cancun Release”

KellySchlamb Kelly Schlamb
DB2 pureScale and PureData Systems Specialist, IBM

cancun_beachToday, I’m thinking about the beach. We’re heading into the last long weekend of the summer, the weather is supposed to be nice, and later today I’ll be going up to the lake with my family. But that’s not really why the beach is on my mind. Today, the DB2 “Cancun Release” was announced and made available, and as somebody that works extensively with DB2 and pureScale, it’s a pretty exciting day.

I can guarantee you that you that over the next little while, you’re going to be hearing a lot about the various new features and capabilities in the “Cancun Release” (also referred to as Cancun Release 10.5.0.4 or DB2 10.5 FP4). For instance, the new Shadow Tables feature — which exploits DB2 BLU Acceleration — allows for real-time analytics processing and reporting on your transactional database system. Game changing stuff. However, I’m going to leave those discussions up to others or for another time and today I’m going to focus on what’s new for pureScale.

As with any major new release, some things are flashy and exciting, while other things don’t have that same flash but make a real difference in the every day life of a DBA. Examples of the latter in Cancun include the ability to perform online table reorgs and incremental backups (along with support for DB2 Merge Backup) in a pureScale environment, additional Optim Performance Manager (OPM) monitoring metrics and alerts around the use of HADR with pureScale, and being able to take GPFS snapshot backups. All of this leads to improved administration and availability.

There’s a large DB2 pureScale community out there and over the last few years we’ve received a lot of great feedback on the up and running experience. Based on this, various enhancements have been made to provide faster time to value, with the improved ease of use and serviceability of installation, configuration, and updates. This includes improved installation documentation, enhanced prerequisite checking, beefing up some of the more common error and warning messages, improved usability for online fix pack updates, and the ability to perform version upgrades of DB2 members and CFs in parallel.

In my opinion, the biggest news (and yes, the flashiest stuff) is the addition of new deployment options for pureScale. Previously, the implementation of a DB2 pureScale cluster required specialized network adapters — RDMA-capable InfiniBand or RoCE (RDMA over Converged Ethernet) adapter cards. RDMA stands for Remote Direct Memory Access and it allows for direct memory access from one computer into that of another without involving either one’s kernel, so there’s no interrupt handling and no context-switching that takes place as part of sending a message via RDMA (unlike with TCP/IP-based communication). This allows for very high-throughput, low-latency message passing, which DB2 pureScale uniquely exploits for very fast performance and scalability. Great upside, but a downside is the requirement on these adapters and an environment that supports them.

Starting in the DB2 Cancun Release, a regular, commodity TCP/IP-based interconnect can be used instead (often referred to as using “TCP/IP sockets”). What this gives you is an environment that has all of the high availability aspects of an RDMA-based pureScale cluster, but it isn’t necessarily going to perform or scale as well as an RDMA-based cluster will. However, this is going to be perfectly fine for many scenarios. Think about your daily drive to work. While you’d like to have a fast sports car for the drive in, it isn’t necessary for that particular need (maybe that’s a bad example — I’m still trying to convince my wife of that one). With pureScale, there are cases where availability is the predominant motivator for using it and there might not be a need to drive through massive amounts of transactions per second or scale up to tens of nodes. Your performance and scalability needs will dictate whether RDMA is required or not for your environment. By the way, you might see this feature referred to as pureScale “lite”. I’m still slowly warming up to that term, but the important thing is people know that “lite” doesn’t imply lower levels of availability.

With the ability to do this TCP/IP sockets-based communication between nodes, it also opens up more virtualization options. For example DB2 pureScale can be implemented using TCP/IP sockets in both VMware (Linux) and KVM (Linux) on Intel, as well as in AIX LPARs on Power boxes. These virtualized environments provide a lower cost of entry and are perfect for development, production environments with moderate workloads, QA, or just getting yourself some hands-on experience with pureScale.

It’s also worth pointing out that DB2 pureScale now supports and is optimized for IBM’s new POWER8 platform.

Having all of these new deployment options changes the economics of continuous availability, allowing broad infrastructure choices at every price point.

One thing that all of this should show you is the continued focus and investment in the DB2 pureScale technology by IBM research and development. With all of the press and fanfare around BLU, people often ask me if this is at the expense of IBM’s other technologies such as pureScale. You can see that this is definitely not the case. In fact, if you happen to be at Insight 2014 (formerly known as IOD) in Las Vegas in October, or at IDUG EMEA in Prague in November, I’ll be giving a presentation on everything new for pureScale in DB2 10.5, up to and including the “Cancun Release”. It’s an impressive amount of features that’s hard to squeeze into an hour. 🙂

For more information on what’s new for pureScale and DB2 in general with this new release, check out the fix pack summary page in the DB2 Information Center.

6 Responses to pureScale at the Beach. – What’s New in the DB2 “Cancun Release”

  1. Pingback: DB2 Hub | pureScale at the Beach. – What’s New in the DB2 “Cancun Release”

  2. Iqbal Goralwalla says:

    Great blog Kelly – hope the w/end at the lake is as great! 🙂 Really excited about this release and pureScale “lite”.

  3. Kiran says:

    This is really awesome. If we can try out the Purescale in environments normal LAN connectivity with TCPIP communications.

  4. Kiran says:

    This is really awesome. If we can try out the Purescale in environments with normal LAN connectivity with TCPIP communications.

  5. Jorge says:

    Hi Kelly
    Is it possible to implement a very simple pureScale environment under Linux using desktop PCs with just internal disks? I do not want to put load on it or expect any good performance, just make it work. I there is any white paper, presentation or document, please point me to that. Thanks
    Jorge

  6. Kelly says:

    Hi Jorge. When used in a multiple server (PC) environment, there is a requirement for shared disks, which is accomplished via SAN storage. If you are looking to do some basic testing on a single server/PC, then you can look at using VMware with multiple partitions all on the same server. In this case, local disks on the PC can be used. More information on this configuration can be found here: http://www-01.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/SSEPGG_10.5.0/com.ibm.db2.luw.qb.server.doc/doc/t0061459.html

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